Spirit of a SoulFit Woman- “If” by Rudyard Kipling

 “If” by Rudyard KiplingIf you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs and blaming it on you, If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, but make allowance for their doubting too;

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, or being lied about, don’t deal in lies, or being hated, don’t give way to hating, and yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise.

If you can dream – and not make dreams your master; If you can think – and not make thoughts your aim; If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster and treat those two impostors just the same;

If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, or watch the things you gave your life to, broken, and stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools.

If you can make one heap of all your winnings and risk it all on one turn of pitch-and-toss, and lose, and start again at your beginnings and never breathe a word about your loss;

If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew to serve your turn long after they are gone, and so hold on when there is nothing in you except the Will which says to them: “Hold on!”

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, or walk with kings–nor lose the common touch, If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you; If all men count with you, but none too much.

If you can fill the unforgiving minute with sixty seconds’ worth of distance run, yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it, and–which is more–you’ll be a Man, my son!

This poem “If” by Rudyard Kipling was shared with me by one of my foster sisters, Lakisha when I was eleven years old. She was many years older than me.  I was having a down moment. Lakisha tried to comfort me but the hurt wouldn’t ease.  She pulled out a box and took out a folded piece of paper and read these words to me.  I didn’t quite get the meaning of the poem at first but as she explained each stanza I began to have a better understanding and I felt better and could feel the depth of the poem. I felt better.

This poem is special to me because from this point on as I faced challenges I would reflect back on these words to lead me towards the life I imagined in my heart.  I have learned that the worst experiences of my life gave birth to the best things in my life.

 

What do you take away from these words?

 

Your SoulFit Sista,

Dana

 

 

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  • Comments

    1. Dana, thanks so much for sharing this poem. This stanza really spoke to me today “If you can make one heap of all your winnings and risk it all on one turn of pitch-and-toss, and lose, and start again at your beginnings and never breathe a word about your loss.”


    2. Twitter:
      Like it! Thanks. Hold your own no matter what~ Best Regards, Wendy


    3. Twitter:
      What a beautiful poem, and I love that your foster sister shared it with you…what a lovely gift. It makes me feel relaxed and powerful at the same time, knowing that if I got with the flow of my life, enjoying it, everything is available to me. Thank you for sharing something so special to you, magical Dana :)

    4. Thanks for sharing. It is a beautiful poem and I can see why you enjoy it so much. It is very powerful.

      Anita


    5. Twitter:
      Mmmm…. love this Dana. The stanza that spoke most pwerfully to me was:

      “If you can make one heap of all your winnings and risk it all on one turn of pitch-and-toss, and lose, and start again at your beginnings and never breathe a word about your loss;”

      It says so much… be a risk taker, never give up, know that if you did it once you can rebuild and do it again, and most importantly of all… no complaining… take responsibility for your life and choices and actions… no need to be a victim, unless you choose to be! At least that’s what I take away…

      Wonderful post, beautiful Dana… <3

    6. This poem is such a powerful description of good character overall that it is hard to pick one thing out. The piece that grabs me tonight is the idea of treating both triumph and disaster as imposters. Great post!

      • SoulFit Sista, Dana Mallon says:

        Hi Melinda! I agree:-) I love the benefits we can receive when we practice treating both triumph and disaster as impostors.

    7. Jeanine Byers says:


      Twitter:
      Beautiful poem, Dana! The part that speaks most to me is this part: “If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, or walk with kings–nor lose the common touch, If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you; If all men count with you, but none too much.”


    8. Twitter:
      I love this poem and the part “If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster and treat those two impostors just the same.” This has been a difficult goal for me but one worth the effort. Buddha says the cause of all suffering is attachment to wanting things to be a certain way. When we can meet everything with the same love whether it’s triumph or disaster therein lies true freedom from pain & suffering.

      • SoulFit Sista, Dana Mallon says:

        Hi Julie! Thanks for sharing and I loved what you’ve shared about the cause of all suffering. Maybe it will help to just allow yourself to practice seeing triumph and disaster just the same.

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